Hug a Gerontologist: We are Having an Identity Crisis

Screenshot-2018-3-21 Keep Calm and Hug a Gerontologist T-Shirt
This is an actual t-shirt you can buy from https://www.cafepress.com.

Please hug a gerontologist next time you meet one. I do mean a gerontologist, not a geriatrician. I do not mean to not hug a geriatrician. Go ahead and hug them too if it feels right. I have some friends who are geriatricians and they are, for lack of a better term, “the cat’s pajamas”.  What I mean is that gerontologists, specifically, need some love because we are having an identity crisis.

How do I know this? Here is some evidence.

Almost every time I meet someone and tell them I am a gerontologist they ask me medical questions and where I see patients.  You see, I am often mistaken for a geriatrician, who is a medical doctor specializing in the health of older people. I make it very clear to people that I am not a medical doctor. In fact, I have anxiety that I am going to be speaking at a workshop one day and someone is going to yell “Is there a doctor in the house?”  People will point at me, and I will not be able to help as I have no medical training. Yes, it is true. Gerontologists generally do not have medical training, unless they are also physicians, nurses, or other medical professionals.  Do we have some knowledge of the medical aspects of aging? Sure. Just as we have knowledge of the psychological, biological, social, and spiritual aspects of aging. We are trained to think broadly about the aging experience.

This leads me to another aspect of the identity crisis. It is sort of our fault.

You see, we have really not done a good job of explaining who we are. We really have not owned the uniqueness of gerontology as different from other disciplines that study aging. Lots of other fields of study focus on aging, like psychology, biology, social work, etc. And it can be quite confusing because a psychologist can also consider herself a gerontologist, or a nurse might be a gerontological nurse. Sometimes I am not sure if we know who we are. And I think this had led to missed opportunities in how gerontology as a study and practice can truly be something different.

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I realize that no one is asking me to be the Leader of the Gerontologists, but in the spirit of being heard, I think we need a revolution in the field of gerontology, and it starts with reclaiming and re-framing our identity. This is important because the paradigm of aging needs to change. When I say the paradigm needs to change, I am not talking about “those people” need to change. I am talking about all of us, even gerontologists. Perhaps, as gerontologists, we need to be leading the way. However, in order to do this, we need to articulate and embrace our identity, and it needs to reflect a different paradigm of growing older.

In my mind, gerontology is unique because it is the multi-dimensional view of growing older. The very nature of this recognizes that growing older is complex and individual. The idea of gerontology as multi-dimensional, complex, and individualistic needs to be clearly articulated, and operationalized through education, research, practice, and policy in aging.

We are an important companion to our great sister, geriatrics, which also seeks to integrate various aspects of medicine and wellness. To that point, promoting and emphasizing gerontology as a non-medical study of aging is an opportunity that we need to claim.  Because so much of aging is viewed through a medical lens, the field of gerontology is positioned to offer a wider lens of aging by continually trying to understand the multi-dimensional experience of  growing older and applying this knowledge in supporting people to live fully.

Gerontology is about the lived, individual experience of growing older. This is inherently person-centered. This means that central to gerontology should be the voices of people growing older. This also means that we have to take a good look at the “expert culture” in gerontology that positions professionals as holding more knowledge and power than elders, and possible discounting what is important to people as they grow older. Are gerontologists truly “experts” in aging? Or, do we simply offer a perspective of growing older?  What is our role? Are we facilitators of all these dimensions in the multi-dimensional, individual experience of aging? Is our job to infuse this into everything we do?

I have an idea that maybe helps us to think about this. I have a new definition of aging that I have been mulling about.

Aging is the process of becoming oneself.

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If that is true, then gerontology is the study of becoming oneself as we grow with age. When I think of the idea of becoming oneself, it means both evolving, which is continually becoming something new, and rooting, becoming even more deeply who you are. In some ways, then, could gerontologists be midwives of growing older? In fact, a definition of midwife is “a person or thing that produces or aids in producing something new or different”. Gerontologists could be those people who “midwife” the experience of aging as a multi-faceted, individual experience, by viewing all aspects of a person. We could bring the lived experiences of individuals who are growing older to everything we do.

I think it is time for gerontologists to really think about who we are. Maybe even to challenge who we have become and whether it is who we want to be. We have such an opportunity here, to midwife, in so many ways, something new. But it would help us if we had hugs.

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7 thoughts on “Hug a Gerontologist: We are Having an Identity Crisis

  1. Dear Sonya, Of course (entirely predictable) I LOVED this post!!! Yes indeed…. the wholeness of aging is so much more than a medical or clinical issue!!! And the amazing spectrum of gerontology is almost too much to think about… and I suppose that’s why few people do it… it’s just too hard! That said, I personally believe that the topic of aging is so enlightening and rewarding and surprising. “Becoming one’s self” is indeed a lifelong experience, and becomes all the richer and more nuanced as one ages. There has never been a time more appropriate for the Gerontologist Manifesto to be proclaimed. We need you!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Thank you, Annette! I love the idea of a Gerontologist Manifesto! As I am reading your comments and those of others, I am thinking also about this idea that gerontology spans multiple “applications” – research, practice, education, etc. Yet. foundationally, we do need a manifesto that speaks to all of us and what we do. I think that traditionally, these types of descriptions about gerontologists have been more oriented to academic and research gerontology. However, for many reasons we need to climb out of these boxes. Maybe another post!

    Like

  3. Here is a contrary opinion from the other side of the fence.
    I am a geriatrician and family physician. When people in conversation ask me what “do,” I never want to tell them I’m a doctor, because I don’t really want to hear about their sore knee, or their mother’s bad hospital experience last year, or the question they are dying to ask someone about a herbal remedy, etc. etc.
    So I tell them I am a gerontologist.
    They give me a blank look, and I introduce another topic.
    Works every time.
    I love it.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Ha! I think you are underscoring my point 🙂 I once had someone at a dinner party, after several glasses of wine, ask me what I did. A few days later he called me with his mom on the line, expecting me to assess her cognition. Lesson learned: don’t explain what you do when people are drinking wine.

    Like

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